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Trail of Cthulhu: Slaves of the Mother

Slaves of the Mother

Continuing the post-apocalyptic campaign, this work contains three linked adventures which are set three years after the end of the last part of Dead White World, in 1939. To start with, the group needs to decide what has been going on these past three years. The Investigators are assumed to have survived, unless any player wishes to start off a new character, and they need to have found some kind of refuge. This will need a supply of fresh water untainted by those white flowers and access to a food supply - canned food, probably. There may be other folks there, or the Investigators might be on their own. Alternatively, they may have been leading a nomadic life, one step ahead of whatever monsters are out there. Suggestions are made as to how various Skills might be used to help cover these missing years, and find out a bit about what is going on.

At the end of the last adventure in Dead White World the party had to make a decision. They are now living with the result: England is now either overrun with strange white flowers or crawling with Deep Ones. Throughout, notes are provided to cater with both options, with them being referred to generically as 'Creatures'. The scene is set in the Introduction with explanations of the likely state of play depending on what the party is having to contend with, this will help you set the scene as the game begins. Thereafter, when the effects are different depending on what is there, this is clearly indicated.

Then on to the first adventure, Bright Futures, which is set in Brighton on the south coast of England. For some reason, Brighton is free of the Creatures, so the Investigators seek refuge there. The question remains, why do the Creatures stay away? Discovering the answer will likely make the party want to leave, even if they are not forced out ny the gang that's controlling the town. If the party decide to put a stop to what is going on, Brighton will soon be overrun by the Creatures, but is the price of keeping them at bay too high?

The next adventure is The Nation Set Free, and concerns a military plot to develop a weapon, a bomb, that has the potential to defeat the Creatures. The price of success may, however, be too high... and everything about the research when the party travels to Cambridge is a bit odd. Rather a lot of assumptions about player-character actions are made in this adventure, but fortunately some advice is provided as to what to do if they refuse to cooperate. What with more Mythos creatures hanging around, the count-down beginning and growing indications that the bomb isn't going to do precisely what is intended lead to a rather fraught climax in which options seem few and none of them good.

The final adventure - assuming the party survives the last one - takes them to Brichester where they can uncover the horrible truth behind the entire apocalypse. Things have changed rapidly since the end of the previous adventure, nature appears to be reasserting herself with unparalleled vigour - this may also be affecting the Investigators themselves, too. Things only get stranger from then on in, with crazy librarians and even more Mythos beings swarming across the plot. Ultimately, can they find a reason to live rather than throw themselves into oblivion? Should they survive, England is lost, but there is remarkably a serviceable aircraft to take them away...

These adventures get stranger and stranger, to the point it's hard to distinguish what is normal and where madness lies. Careful preparation is needed to understand what is going on, while to keep the game on track you may need to railroad the party a bit. It is strange, disturbing... and meets the worst nightmare of what a Mythos-driven apocalypse might actually be like.

Return to Slaves of the Mother page.

Reviewed: 30 March 2017